Panther Falls - Banff National Park - Hiking Alberta

 

The short hike into Panther Falls begins from Bridal Veil Falls parking along the infamous and scenic Icefields Parkway in Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada.

 

Panther Falls, Icefields Parkway, Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada

 

The pullout for viewing Bridal Veil Falls is along the Icefields Parkway immediately above the Big Bend hairpin turn.  Driving with care is important as vehicles, some of them are large buses and RVs, will be entering and departing from the large paved parking area. 

The signed trail-head is located at the south end of the large parking area.  The short hiking trail is only 0.5 KM (¹⁄₃ mile) one-way.  From guarded views of Bridal Veil Falls, the heavily used trail descends abruptly into forest via switchbacks carved into the side of a steep slope.  There are a couple of obstacles in the form of dead fall and rocky outcroppings.

 

Panther Falls, Icefields Parkway, Banff National Park, Alberta, CanadaPanther Falls, Icefields Parkway, Banff National Park, Alberta, CanadaPanther Falls, Icefields Parkway, Banff National Park, Alberta, CanadaPanther Falls, Icefields Parkway, Banff National Park, Alberta, CanadaPanther Falls, Icefields Parkway, Banff National Park, Alberta, CanadaPanther Falls, Icefields Parkway, Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada

 

At the trail junction, the trail straight ahead leads to impressive Panther Falls.  A swirling breeze can make photography challenging.  Protect the camera inside a jacket until the mist is heading in a non-threatening direction long enough for a rapid composure.  A lens cloth is mandatory.

Panther Falls is over a descent in the path of Nigel Creek.  Good photographs can be obtained by venturing carefully onto muddy, rocky and slippery terrain.  Several steep drops near the site require caution and common sense to manage exposure. 

Far below the thrashing, white water of Nigel Creek, heavily laden with glacial silt, continues downstream to capture the water from Bridal Veil Falls on the way to confluence with the North Saskatchewan River near the Big Bend at the hairpin turn on the Icefields Parkway.  In winter Panther Falls is a popular ice climbing area and a photographer's dream landscape of ice formations.

 

Panther Falls, Icefields Parkway, Banff National Park, Alberta, CanadaPanther Falls, Icefields Parkway, Banff National Park, Alberta, CanadaPanther Falls, Icefields Parkway, Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada

 

On the short return hike to the trail-head there is a great commotion above on the approach to the still-invisible parking area.  There is robust yelling and screaming combined with the sound of confused traffic.  Perhaps an accident has occurred in the brief absence.  As the final switchback breaches the trail-head at the surface, there is a mob of people racing in all directions with cameras, smart phones and tablets. 

 

Panther Falls, Icefields Parkway, Banff National Park, Alberta, CanadaPanther Falls, Icefields Parkway, Banff National Park, Alberta, CanadaPanther Falls, Icefields Parkway, Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada

 

Traffic on the Icefields Parkway has come to a grinding halt in both directions and cars, buses and recreational vehicles are stopped helter-skelter at every conceivable direction a traffic jam can produce.  The majority of people's attention is directed to one specific area above the highway. 

A family of mountain sheep has ascended through a gully near the trail and crossed the road.  Whenever this happens, and it frequently does, pandemonium ensues.  Miraculously, there is no evidence of vehicle collision or personal injury.  The sheep have taken station on the steep slope above the opposite side of the highway to pose graciously for photographs.  It is a tad embarrassing to be part of it but they are very cute and the mountain sheep family includes a youngster which makes the image completely irresistible.

 

Panther Falls, Icefields Parkway, Banff National Park, Alberta, CanadaPanther Falls, Icefields Parkway, Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada

 

Eventually, the mountain sheep wander down the slope and onto the traffic-saturated highway to pose for close-up photographs.

Since there will be extra time, while the sheep continue their cameo appearance and absorption of adoration,  A few photographs of Bridal Veil Falls are attempted through surrounding trees.  Substantially better photographs are available by walking down the highway for half a kilometer.

Bridal Veil Falls is a thin ribbon of falling water which originates high above at the Huntington Glacier, before dropping 370 m (1,200 ft) down the steep slopes of 3,270 m (10,729 ft) Cirrus Mountain into Nigel Creek.  From the Bridal Veil Falls viewpoint only the bottom 120 m (370 ft) of the waterfalls are visible.

Cirrus Mountain is home to several ice climbing routes in Banff National ParkPolar Circus and the Weeping Wall are popular ice climbs featured in the guide book 'Waterfall Ice, Climbs in the Canadian Rockies' by Joe JosephsonPolar Circus features 730 m (2300 ft)+/- gain with over 488 m (1600 ft) of waterfall ice spread out over 9+/- pitches. 

 

Bridal Veil Falls, Icefields Parkway, Banff National Park, Alberta, CanadaBridal Veil Falls, Icefields Parkway, Banff National Park, Alberta, CanadaBridal Veil Falls, Icefields Parkway, Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada

 

Bridal Veil Viewpoint offers spectacular vistas of surrounding majestic mountain summits.

 

Bridal Veil Falls, Icefields Parkway, Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada

 

This short stop generated far more excitement than could possibly have been anticipated.

Photographs for this brief hike to Panther Falls and Bridal Veil Falls along the Icefields Parkway in Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada are taken on Tuesday, July 28, 2015.

 

 

 

 

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Comments

I love the falls and views. I understand the excitement of the goats. We were travelling in a National Park north of Denver when the traffic came to a standstill. Eventually we got to the excitement which was a large herd of elk. Just beautiful.

Yes, it is always a special sight.  I can recall herds of Buffalo occupying the highway in Yellowstone National Park.  There is no alternative to waiting for the massive animals to move along and until they do, traffic is at a standstill without feasible alternatives.  Time to break out the snacks and have a mini in-car party while one of best, free shows on Earth wanders by the windows.  Thanks for your comment, Helen.

Buffalo! Now that would have been some sight.

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