Royal Tyrrell Museum - Drumheller - Hiking Alberta

 

Royal Tyrrell Museum is a place of dinosaurs near Drumheller, Alberta, Canada.

 

 

The Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, an hour and a half northeast of Calgary, Alberta, is situated a short drive northwest on North Dinosaur Trail from Drumheller, and immersed in the unique and awe-inspiring Canadian BadlandsDrumheller is a perennially favorite location for unique entertainment with the opportunity to learn fascinating facts about the development of life on Earth.  This day provides the opportunity to spend valuable time with family.  The modern and well-appointed museum is virtually hidden from the highway and accessed via rugged, badlands terrain on a winding paved road.  Signage throughout is excellent.

 

Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada

 

The tour and the learning experience begins on the pathway to the entrance accompanied by life-like, full-size replicas of prehistoric life.

 

Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada

Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada Granddaughter Katherine is watched carefully by a curious baby dinosaur near the entrance to the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology near Drumheller, Alberta, Canada.

 

The entrance to the museum is embellished with a beautiful pond surrounded by benches and picnic tables for relaxation.  The pond, with fountains, is also an intermediate staging location to short, easy hikes on well-maintained paths adjacent to the complex which immerse participants in the grandeur of colorful tiered mounds typical to badlands.

 

Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada

 

Inside the museum entrance, there is a charge for admission which includes a tour map of the large, well-organized facility to get maximum benefit from the exhibits representing progression of life on Earth.  There are many hands-on or audio-supported exhibits to facilitate understanding of spectacular examples or phenomena. 

There is also a playroom for children with an assortment of pneumatic tubes which can be loaded with Nerf-like balls and fired like cannons at fascinating targets or occasionally, other participants.  Be careful where you stand.  About midway through the tour there is an area where real-time reconstruction of unearthed skeletal remains can be observed through large plate-glass windows.  It is fascinating to observe the variety of instruments used to extricate fossilized bones from their earthly surroundings.

 

Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada Exhibits are life-like recreations in convincing surroundings at the Royal Museum of Palaeontology near Drumheller, Alberta, Canada

 

Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada There are hundreds of exhibits in a wide variety of classifications. This is a large sample of ammolite at the Royal Museum of Palaeontology near Drumheller, Alberta, Canada.

 

The most popular exhibits occur near the end of the walking tour.  These skeletal reconstructions, ranging from minute to massive, capture the imagination and leave lasting impressions.  Little people often gaze with eyes like saucers.

 

Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada

 

Many of the specimens are contained in areas which attempt to replicate the way prehistoric surroundings may have appeared.  There is a dark tunnel with a glass floor and an aquarium wall which illustrates the progression of underwater life while a soundtrack, in synchronization with moving spot lights, separates individual specimens for educational enlightenment.

 

Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada Replicas of prehistoric plant life in the dark 'aquarium' tunnel at the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology near Drumheller, Alberta, Canada

 

Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada Michael beside a dinosaur leg bone illustrates the mass of the larger animals.

 

Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada Granddaughter Katherine is dwarfed by the large dinosaur leg bone.

 

Exhibits throughout the museum are often accompanied by large samples of petrified wood which is plentiful and protected in the badlands inside and outside the museum.

 

Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada

 

Towards the end of the tour, exhibits include a broad range of skeletal specimens.

 

Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada

 

Near the end of the tour, more modern animals, prehistoric relatives of animals which roam the earth today, occupy exhibits until the end point enters a fascinating gift shop.  There is a large selection of gift shop standards but also a broad range of very unique items relevant to the nature of this amazing attraction.  If you have never been to the world-renowned Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, it is worth the time to change that.  The museum is truly a unique, world-class and remarkable facility, and more seriously, considered a leading research facility, with specific expertise, servicing many countries around the world. 

On departure, the short drive further north on North Dinosaur Trail provides the opportunity to have photographs taken at and in The Little Church that seats ten thousand people.  Today plans include subsequent visits to the nearby  Drumheller Hoodoos and the historic Atlas Coal Mine

The Canadian Badlands are a rich source of unique terrain and early Canadian coal mining history.

 

Photos for this visit to the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology in Drumheller, Alberta, Canada were captured on July 15, 2013.

 

 

 

 

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