Deadman's Pond - St. John's - Hiking Newfoundland

 

Deadman's Pond on Signal Hill is macabre mystery above St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada.

 

 

Weather is alternating rapidly between sun, cloud and rain.  As Mélanie and I descend Signal Hill Road, from the summit of the Signal Hill parking area, to visit the Signal Hill Visitor Centre, enthusiasm created by the morning walking tour of Cabot Tower, Queen's Battery and Ladies' Lookout remains high. 

The Parks Canada representative at the Visitor Centre convinces us to attend a movie presentation in their small but cozy theater.  What initially holds low expectation, turns out to be a fascinating and enlightening, 20 minute, historical presentation, hosted conversationally on dual screens, of historical events and life as it was centuries before in St. John's and on Signal Hill.  Well done and very informative.

The next objective is fabled Deadman's Pond, further down Signal Hill.  This  historic location is beneath the infamous Gibbet Hill Lookout and across Signal Hill Road from the modern and impressive Johnson Geo Centre.

 

Deadman's Pond_- St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada The Johnson Geo Centre - Signal Hill - St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada

 

To avoid the drizzle of the moment, we investigate this relatively new attraction which is essentially a Newfoundland, geological science center combined with four movie theaters.  The surrounding landscape offers interpretive walking trails with spectacular views over St. John's in clear conditions.  The movie presentations are very tempting.  Admission, combined with the cost of the movie, seems expensive.

Following a few minutes of discussion the choice is to stick with the original plan and allocate time for a walk around nearby Deadman's Pond.  There is so much to do and so little time.  The walk across Signal Hill Road begins the scenic walk around Deadman's Pond.

 

Deadman's Pond_- St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada Gibbet Hill above Deadman's Pond on Signal Hill in St. John's Newfoundland, Canada.

 

Deadman's Pond hosts a notorious past.  Decades of armed conflict, combined with the customary occurrence of criminal activity, attracted by any newly developing area of potential wealth, results in the military and fledgling judicial system issuing orders for summary and capital punishment.  

Executions were conducted at a gallows on Gibbet Hill.  Offenders were occasionally hung in public as a deterrent to further crime.  Their bodies were covered in tar for extended preservation, and suspended on poles for display.  The notion bodies were deposited into the 'bottomless pit' of Deadman's Pond is suggested but not universally substantiated.  This innocent looking pond, and its troubled history, have been intensely investigated.  The small pond is obviously not bottomless, but it has been proven to be exceptionally deep.  Human bones have purportedly been discovered at the bottom.  Nothing leaps out at us while we circumvent this serene water source with surrounding shrubbery, flowers and birds.

 

Deadman's Pond_- St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada What appears to be so beautiful and peaceful was once a place of atrocity. Gibbet Hill behind Deadman's Pond on Signal Hill.

 

A large, nearly square, viewing platform is under construction near Deadman's Pond.  The wooden platform provides an amazing view over St. John's Harbour.  In the centre of the platform is a long, vertical pole with a cross beam near the top. Maybe this new construction is intended to interpretively address the gruesome act of gibbeting practiced in the 1700's on Gibbet Hill above Deadman's Pond.

 

Deadman's Pond_- St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada Deadman's Pond_- St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada During this short, casual stroll initial intermittent rain turns to sunshine. 

 

Mélanie and I discover we convert, with the change from inclement to great weather, from lethargic, indecisive persons to high-energy, happy and super-productive discovery machines. 

The next mission for this day is the drive around the perimeter of St. John's Harbour to explore Fort Amherst on the other side of the Narrows.

 

 

 

 

 

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Comments

Very nice article, glad you enjoyed your time here. I just wanted to update you on that platform with the pole in the middle. It is indeed a lookout, with a replica of a ship built on it, elevating the view. That pole is indeed meant to be a mast of a ship. I have a few photos of it, but can't post images on this article. I can gladly send them along to you if you'd like.

Thank you, Ryan. I will check out your photos on your Facebook page at RParsonsPhotos. Thanks for the info. It was under construction when we were there. Really enjoyed our time in Newfoundland. Looking forward to returning for the East Coast Trail and a much longer adventure.

I love Newfoundland! And I love that Deadman's Pond is bottomless, because it creates a big mystery. My Mom was born in Newfoundland, and most of Mom's side of the family are Newfoundlanders.

Thank you for your comment, Chloe.  I love Newfoundland too.  It is a magical place and I hope I have the opportunity to travel there again to hike the world famous East Coast Trail.  Newfoundlanders are wonderful friendly people.

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