Free Meeting House - Moncton - Hiking New Brunswick

 

The Free Meeting House represents early history in Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada.

 

 

The Free Meeting House in Moncton, New Brunswick shares the same downtown 20 Mountain Road address with the Moncton Museum.  Both attractions are closed for extensive renovation or expansion but Mélanie strikes up a fortuitous conversation with a gentleman who has just completed an on-site, outdoor management meeting with construction contractors. 

The new friend becomes the impromptu tour guide and opens the Free Meeting House for our exclusive viewing.  Additionally, he gives his time to share extensive knowledge of this historic structure originally built in 1821 as an omni-denominational place of worship for international immigrants and religions.

 

Free_Meeting_House - 1821 - Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada The 1821 Free Meeting House in Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada

 

The historic building rests graciously under a massive, ancient oak tree, and a large brass plaque beside the entrance sidewalk provides a brief overview of the building's purpose and history.  Great community progress was created here as various religions and leadership groups routinely gathered for more than 140 years, long past the original mandate of providing a common meeting place until individual churches could be built.  Perhaps there may be an important historical message here about the axiomatic value of synergistic effort.

 

 

Free_Meeting_House - 1821 - Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada The 1821 Free Meeting House in Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada

 

The interior of the Free Meeting House has been fully restored and is overwhelmingly austere with bland colors and lack of symbols and ornamentation.  The historic structure is truly non-denominational with a focus on people working together.  The New Brunswick Centennial restoration of 1990 includes a small glass-covered panel on the wall which shows a portion of plaster wall and the underlying, hand-hewn lattice, fitting together like a giant jigsaw puzzle.

 

Free_Meeting_House - 1821 - Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada The internal view of the 1821 Free Meeting House in Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada

 

Free_Meeting_House - 1821 - Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada Another internal view of the 1821 Free Meeting House in Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada

 

Free_Meeting_House - 1821 - Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada The pulpit in the 1821 Free Meeting House in Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada

 

Free_Meeting_House - 1821 - Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada A section of the original wall, preserved and displayed, as it was prior to a major 1990 Centennial renovation, at the 1821 Free Meeting House in Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada

 

Immediately outside the front door there is a single, sombre and touching tombstone for Mary Moore Kelly who departed this world on May 15, 1890 at the tender age of 2 years and 1 month.  There may be no greater human reverence than that for the loss of innocent children.  Behind the Free Meeting House many tombstones stand proud in defiance of time.  Some retain faint images of their acknowledgement.  A few are weather-worn to a blank slate but historical records may reveal their identity.

A touching tombstone for a child near the entrance to the 1821 Free Meeting House in Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada

 

Free_Meeting_House - 1821 - Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada Multiple tombstones behind the 1821 Free Meeting House in Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada, tell the story of multicultural diversity.

 

The Free Meeting House has a dignified, calm and relaxing feel about it.  The gracious, extremely knowledgeable and impromptu host provided this unique opportunity to learn more about Maritime history and the early development of the City of Moncton

There are endless stories to hear and tell.  The Free Meeting House was designated as a National Historic Site on June 1, 1990.

 

 

 

 

Categories: 

Tags: 

Comments

Enjoyed reading your writeup on the Free Meeting House. Very informative. I was married there October 2009, partly because my husband is Jewish and I am not, so therefore we couldn't be married in the Synagogue which his grandfather was one of the Cofounders. So we decided on the Free Meeting House and it meant so much to my husband as he knew this was a place of worship for the Jews before the Synagogue was built. His grandfather also ran a business Isaac Selick and Sons on Main Street where the Assumption Place was from 1901 to 1987.

Thank you for the value added, Muriel.  It is good to know the Free Meeting House is still providing meaningful service to the community as an extension to a rich and important history. Congratulations on your 2009 nuptials.

Add new comment