Porcupine Creek - Kananaskis - Hiking Alberta

 

Wandering at Porcupine Creek to Kananaskis River in Kananaskis Country, Alberta.

 

 

Following an excellent hike to Baldy Pass in Kananaskis Country, Alberta, there is still time in the day to wander in the wilderness before returning to Calgary.

Porcupine Creek is a short drive south on Kananaskis Trail.  Access is available from the Baldy Pass trail-head or from Wasootch Creek but most people just park well off roadside at the clearly signed bridge over Porcupine Creek.

 

Porcupine_Creek - Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada

 

Traditionally the Porcupine Creek trail heads east from the bridge for 1.2 KM (¾ miles) before splitting into North or South Porcupine Creek.  Both branches have been hiked in the past but today the hike will proceed west along the expansive Porcupine Creek delta to the Kananaskis River under the impressive east faces of 2,487 m (8160 ft) Mount Lorette and adjacent Mary Barclay's Mountain.

 

Porcupine_Creek - Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada

 

'Hike' may be too strong a word.  It is more 'wandering aimlessly in the sun with direction driven by impulsive visual curiosity combined with path of least resistance'. 

The straight-line distance from the Porcupine Creek bridge to the Kananaskis River is approximately 1.5 KM (⅞ miles).  There are no trails but navigation is easy and interesting.

 

Porcupine_Creek - Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada Porcupine_Creek - Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada Porcupine_Creek - Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada

 

Vistas from the broad, stony delta are overwhelmingly beautiful for such a short distance.

 

Porcupine_Creek - Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada

 

 

The short distance to the clear waters of the Porcupine Creek tributary at the junction with the Kananaskis River is short.  On the other side of the Kananaskis RiverStoney Trail links Rafter Six Ranch Resort and Kananaskis Village

The southern portion of Stoney Trail is closed over the winter from December 15 until June 14 to protect wildlife, so there are no hikers on the other side of the Kananaskis River this day.

 

Porcupine_Creek - Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada Porcupine_Creek - Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada Porcupine_Creek - Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada

 

Following the Kananaskis River off-trail until the forest becomes too dense, the next step is to branch out to the gravel road leading to the Porcupine Group Campground.

 

Porcupine_Creek - Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada

 

On the return walk to the car there is interesting detail surrounded by spectacular mountains.

 

Porcupine_Creek - Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada Porcupine_Creek - Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada Porcupine_Creek - Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada Porcupine_Creek - Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada

 

There are a large number and variety of ancient tin cans that have been washed downstream from long gone mining or logging camps in the mountains.

 

Porcupine_Creek - Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada

 

One of many ant hills, common to this area, is alive with activity.

 

Porcupine_Creek - Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada Click on the image below to enlarge, then on the browser back button to return to the post.

 

There is a final opportunity to enjoy the mountains to the east on the walk back to the car on this excellent hiking day that began with a hike on Mount Baldy and ends with a view of Mount Baldy from Porcupine Creek.

 

Porcupine_Creek - Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada

Porcupine_Creek - Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada Mount Baldy from Porcupine Creek in Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada

 

In hindsight, the return on the north side of the broad river delta of Porcupine Creek is the only regret.  Another time, a short walk along the barren, east shoreline where multiple channels of Porcupine Creek feed the Kananaskis River might set up an interesting retreat along the south shoreline of Porcupine Creek.

 

 

 

 

Categories: 

Tags: 

Comments

Thank you.

Thank you for your comment, Nick. Ant hills are common here in the grasslands. The underground structures are very complex. The ants are innocuous if left alone and undisturbed. It is not a good idea to sit on an ant hill. I have many backpacks for different applications. My standard Mountain Equipment Co-op 25 litre day pack is like an old friend. We have been working together for over 20 years and it carries everything I need to handle reasonable situations. Contents are as outined in my post 'backpack contents'. They will vary slightly around the core by season, terrain and unique weather situations. I have never been a gear junkie and I have grown impervious to aggressive marketing.

I enjoyed viewing your images of Porcupine Creek, nice selection of photos.

Wow, beautiful hike... Absolutely gorgeous. I can't believe you were that close to an entire ant hill, those things looked ravenous. What kind of backpack do you travel with on these numerous hikes Barry?

Add new comment