Autumn in Baker Park – Hiking Alberta

A hike and bike tour through Bowness Park and Baker Park, on opposite sides of the Bow River, in Calgaryis particularly impressive early in this brief fall season when the amount of daylight is decreasing dramatically.  Following are a few images from the day.  I hope you enjoy them.

Fall colours in Bowness Park and Baker Park - Calgary, Alberta, Canada

A tributary pond at the south 84th Street Bridge entrance to Bowness Park

Fall colours in Bowness Park and Baker Park - Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Seagulls and ducks occupy a Bow River sand bar in Bowness Park, Calgary

Fall colours in Bowness Park and Baker Park - Calgary, Alberta, Canada

The floating fountain in Bowness Pond

Fall colours in Bowness Park and Baker Park - Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Fall colours in Bowness Park and Baker Park - Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Falling leaves on Bowness Pond tributaries

Fall colours in Bowness Park and Baker Park - Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Flower basket at the canoe, kayak and paddle boat rental facility in Bowness Park

Fall colours in Bowness Park and Baker Park - Calgary, Alberta, Canada

A view of Baker Park across the Bow River from Bowness Park

Fall colours in Bowness Park and Baker Park - Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Map of Baker Park

Fall colours in Bowness Park and Baker Park - Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Many park benches are placed in memory of loved ones. I found the quotation on this bench significant to me.

Fall colours in Bowness Park and Baker Park - Calgary, Alberta, Canada

A downstream view from Baker Park on the north shore of the Bow River

Fall colours in Bowness Park and Baker Park - Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Bowness Park across the Bow River from Baker Park

Fall colours in Bowness Park and Baker Park - Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Fall colours in Bowness Park and Baker Park - Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Fall colours in Bowness Park and Baker Park - Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Fall colours in Bowness Park and Baker Park - Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Fall colours in Bowness Park and Baker Park - Calgary, Alberta, Canada

 

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10 Responses to Autumn in Baker Park – Hiking Alberta

  1. Helen says:

    Just wonderful shots!!! Would so love to be able to experience a year of seasons changing. We virtually go from winter [your cool summer] to hot summer, here in Brisbane. It is supposedly spring for us at present. As I walk each morning, I get very excited when I manage to spot a shrub in full bloom. Our native bottle brushes and grevilleas are lovely all year round, but don’t have that dramatic impact of a season change.
    This post has also answered a quandry I’ve been in, re when you hike and the time lapse until posting. I had initially assumed the 2 events were closely related. However, now that you are both in Calgary and also driving to Yosemite, it confirms that it is otherwise, which is not at all surprising.
    Keep traveling and hiking. It’s wonderful to be able to experience them through your words and pictures. The Craters of the Moon National Monument is amazing.

    • Thank you for your comment, Helen. I am pleased you are enjoying photos of the fall colours in Calgary. Our autumn is, quite frankly, a bit on the anemic side. The colours in the Calgary, Alberta area tend towards earth colours due to less tree species at a higher elevation and altitude. The really spectacular displays of autumn colour in Canada will be found in Ontario, where I was brought up, in Quebec, and in the Maritime provinces of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. I am ashamed to say I have never been to Newfoundland but I expect their fall colours are also amazing.

      You are right. In the beginning, when I knew even less than I do now about blogging, it seemed right to do everything in a strict chronological sequence. I stumbled into this environment somewhat accidentally. The transition from Windows Live to WordPress dot com to WordPress dot org was extremely frustrating and painful for this technical neophyte. Over the past year, as I have gained some knowledge and experience, I have started posting more at random. The categories sort out the chronological sequence. For example, the Yosemite National Park trip in September 2011 will generate about 30 posts. The trip posts begin in Craters of the Moon National Monument. During this trip there were posts being automatically released of hikes like Ford Knoll and the last hikes in Waterton Lakes National Park. I did not touch a computer for more than two weeks on the Yosemite mission and that was one of the best parts of the trip. I needed a break. On return from Yosemite, I have hiked with a friend in Writing-on-Stone Provincial Park on the Milk River in Southern Alberta near the Montana border. I plan to do that post within the Yosemite posts. In addition, I am redoing hundreds of the original posts to make them more comprehensive and visually pleasing as well as employing Search Engine Optimization. I am not completely sure what that is but apparently it is good for me to do. The poor souls who follow me on Facebook and/or Twitter may find me in Arizona one day, in Montana the next and Alberta a day later. I will be glad when this is all finished. Quite honestly, there are days when I wish I had never clicked on the Windows Live Writer icon on my desktop to find out what it was. It was the birth of a monster. On the other hand, it replaced my previous distribution of hiking experiences to family and friends via text and attached photos in email. This way, potentially more people can share my experiences and I may be able to help people by passing along some of what I have learned. Those who are not interested can move on to other things. I am good with it. My original intent was simply to create personal journals for myself to enjoy in my senior years which may have started yesterday ;-) I try hard to maintain my original objective without getting sucked into the vortex of blogging delirium.

      I appreciate you following along with me and apologize for the confusion in sequence. Eventually, it will settle down.

  2. Laurel says:

    Such a great “getaway” within the city. Fall is my favorite time for hiking with all the leaves changing color.
    Laurel recently posted..Cheese Please: The Best Cheese I’ve Ever Tasted

    • It appears autumn colour will be brief near Calgary this year but it is a special time. Last weekend there was so much traffic on the road from Lake Louise to Moraine Lake, it became necessary to close the road. The fall colour in Larch Valley is spectacular, as you know. It will hang on a bit longer in the Valley of the Ten Peaks so the hike to Eiffel Lakes and Wenkchemna Pass will extend the phenomenal annual experience for a week or so.

  3. Lessa says:

    I am another big fan of fall and these pictures are why, its a truly stunning season to watch.

  4. Helen says:

    “This technical neophyte” is doing a fine job of regularly transporting me to amazing far away places and hikes. If I ever get back to Canada your posts of Waterton Lakes National Park, have definitely put them on my to do list. Had never heard of them before. I have been so engrossed in your posts, I hadn’t even observed the category list. Need some spare time to work through these. Calgary’s fall shots are browsed each morning. The golds are so vivid. A shame Ontario is on the other side of the country.

    • Thank you, Helen. Glad you are enjoying and sharing the hikes. Although Banff and Jasper National Parks rank among Canada’s largest and best known, Waterton Lakes and Yoho National Parks rank higher on my list of magnificent parks. They may not be so large but in wow factor per square kilometre combined with diversity of attraction, they rate very high on my personal list.

  5. Bill says:

    Great fall pics of Bowness Park. Do people still tube down the river this time of year? Although it may be a bit cooler, I believe the scenery of colours would make up for it.

    • Thanks for your comment, Bill. Actually, this day I was hiking in Baker Park was a busy day on the Bow River for rafts, canoes and kayaks. It would be reasonably warm in the sun and the river valley is well protected from wind. The launch sites are on the Bowness Park side of the Bow River where rock barriers create still water locations to safely get vessels into the river flow. The Bow is a big, beautiful river. The heaviest river traffic is in the summer months, of course, but it is common to see craft on the river throughout spring and fall. It is a relatively safe river for the sensible and I believe the rework of the Weir Dam will allow a much longer ride along the Bow River.

  6. Pingback: Bowmont into Baker Park - Calgary - Hiking Alberta

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