Royal Tyrrell Museum - Drumheller - Hiking Alberta

 

Royal Tyrrell Museum of Paleontology is an amazing experience near Drumheller, Alberta.

 

 

The Royal Tyrrell Museum of Paleontology is a world-class museum, located just outside Drumheller, about an hour and a half drive northeast of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

The museum resides within a plethora of alternative attractions and hiking trails reminiscent of the Badlands in the American Southwest.

 

Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology - Drumheller, Alberta, Canada Danger at the entrance to the Royal Tyrrell Museum in Drumheller, Alberta

 

 

The museum is a self guided tour through the periods of the planet's development. There are many fascinating attractions and plenty of opportunities for children to participate with interactive exhibits and computer simulations.

 

Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology - Drumheller, Alberta, Canada Each Royal Tyrrell Museum section represents a period of Earth's development

 

Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology - Drumheller, Alberta, Canada Light levels are low - photography is challenging

 

Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology - Drumheller, Alberta, Canada Prehistoric life developing in the oceans

 

Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology - Drumheller, Alberta, Canada How much underwater life remains undiscovered today?

 

 

There are hundreds of pristine fossil samples of prehistoric life.  One exhibit is a very large sample of ammolite.

 

Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology - Drumheller, Alberta, Canada Ammolite - gems from fossilized ammonites

 

 

The Royal Tyrrell Museum offers a wide variety of unique exhibits and experiences.  There are many photographic opportunities.

 

Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology - Drumheller, Alberta, Canada Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology - Drumheller, Alberta, Canada

 

The museum maintains an impressive botanical garden.

 

Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology - Drumheller, Alberta, Canada Botanical Gardens - Royal Museum of Palaeontology - Drumheller, Alberta

 

Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology - Drumheller, Alberta, Canada Botanical Gardens - Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology - Drumheller, Alberta

 

 

When hiking in, or touring in the Drumheller area, a visit to the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology is an opportunity to learn about the formation of life on the planet and to take a break in a very cool place. 

Driving the Dinosaur Trail reveals some of the most unique scenery in Alberta and introduces a number of scenic vistas and historical treasures. 

To the southwest of Drumheller is the historical Star Mine, the restored tipple at the Atlas Coal Mine just past Hoodoo Provincial Park and the old and fascinating mining town of Wayne, Alberta which hosts a small but resilient population and the Last Chance Saloon.

 

Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology - Drumheller, Alberta, Canada Danger leaving the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology - Drumheller, Alberta, Canada

 

 

 

 

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Comments

Thank you for your comment, Harold. I agree the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology is an amazing facility. I have been there many times and it is common for me to take new visitors there as one of the highlights for new visitors to Calgary. We are in a fascinating location with majestic mountains immediately to the West and big sky prairie to the East with the Drumheller badlands nearby to the northeast. It is a great diversity of terrain. The Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology is a wonderful resource for children and a unique and important place of learning. There are so many activities inside and outside the museum that are well suited to families. I agree there are changing displays that justify repeated periodic visiting and I am looking forward to making the trip again. Another area I find fascinating is Dinosaur Provincial Park east of Calgary near Brooks, Alberta. I have not been there in several years and not since I accidentally began this blog so, this year, I would like to get over there and introduce my readers to that special area with terrain similar to that found at the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology.

I've worked at the Royal Tyrrell Museum for almost 2 years. There is always something new to see. My time at the Royal Tyrrell Museum was a great experience and a priveledge I will never forget. A very educational tour of duty.

Drumheller and the surrounding area is a treasure trove of beautiful and historic attractions. A lot has changed in the last 30 years and a lot has remained the same. There is a nice botanical garden at the Calgary Zoo as well. Devonian Gardens has been closed for several years and I am not sure if or when it will be reinstated. Royal Tyrrell Museum is not a UNESCO World Heritage site but it is gaining a worldwide reputation for the work they do in Palaeontology. Interestingly, the major digs in Alberta, as I understand it, are in Dinosaur Provincial Park nears Brooks in Southeast Alberta. Glad you enjoyed the photographs. Thanks for your comment.

Last time I went to Drumheller was over 30 years ago so I'm overdue for another visit. I particularly love Botanical Gardens so that provides even more of an excuse. Is at a UNESCO world heritage site or is that only the Buffalo Jump? That's a nice set of photos you've added.

There is a lot to see near Drumheller. You can do a tour of a specific area or direction. Many of the little known areas are usually not busy and the scenery and history is unique. Enjoy your next trip. Did you know there are petrified wood deposits in the area as well? Thank you for your comment, June.

Barry, my last visit to Drumheller was almost three years ago. Your post is a prod and a reminder that I must get myself out of Calgary's city vortex and revisit the museum which I do treasure. Thank you.

The Badlands and Drumheller offer an abundance of scenic adventures. I had to think for a moment... which Bridge? There are a lot of them out there but I have decided you are referring to the Suspension Bridge over the Red Deer River into the old Star Mine. I have been there many times and hiked the opposite side in every conceivable direction. Did you know that many years ago, more than twenty, there was an underground fire burning at the abandoned Star Mine complex? There was a hill off to the west with smoke pouring out of the ground. I have not seen evidence of the underground fire in many years so I guess it eventually died from oxygen or fuel deprivation. Drumheller, I believe, has far more to offer than most people realize. You need to root around a bit but there are some amazing attractions out there. Surely you have been to the Church on North Dinosaur Trail which seats 10,000?

Lovely place, lovely pics! I haven't been to Drumheller in a few years, but every time I go, I'm grateful for it. Did you visit the bridge?

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